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An auction system is a series of partnership agreements on the importance of imperatives. The auction system of a partnership usually consists of a central system, modified and supplemented by specific agreements (optional adaptations integrated into the main system for dealing with certain auction situations) that are chosen between the partners before playing. The boundary between a known convention and part of a system is not always clear: some auction systems contain conventions defined by default. Auction systems can be divided into essentially natural systems such as Acol and Standard American and mainly artificial systems such as the Precision Club and the Polish Club. The situations described here are extremely simple examples; Many Advanced Bidding cases include specific agreements regarding very specific situations and subtle conclusions about entire sequences of calls. Bridge is a trick game for four players with thirteen tricks per deal. [16] [17] Dominant variations of the game are rubber bridges more common in social play; and double bridge that allows a comparative score in the game of the tournament. Each player receives thirteen cards from a standard 52 card deck. A turn begins when a player leads, that is, plays the first card. The leader of the first round is determined by the auction; The leader for each next round is the player who won the previous trick. Each player plays a card on the turn clockwise.

Players must play a card of the same color as the original card, unless they do not have one (which is qualified as invalid), in which case they can play any card. [15] The four players are in two partnerships, with each player sitting in front of their partner. This is an objective test of the intention of the parties at the time of conclusion of the contract. Conduct is reluctant if it essentially deprives the innocent party of any benefit that must be obtained in return for the performance of its future obligations under the treaty. . . .